After you upgrade your VCenter to 6.5, you’re stuck at Loading screen

After you upgrade your VCenter to 6.5, you’re stuck at loading screen after you login.

This happens because the user you are logging in does not have the proper permission. To fix the issue, try logging in as user administrator@vsphere.local (using the credential you used for setting up the single sign on).

Once you’re logged in as administrator@vsphere.local, add the problematic user to proper group, so you can login and manage the VM.

From Home, go to Administration.

Under the Administration menu, go to Single Sign-On, and select Users and Groups. Chooose the user you want to assign permissions to.

Then you give the user the proper Assigned Role that you need.

 

VMware-users

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Enable RealTek NIC on VMWare VSphere 6.5

When you try to install VMWare 6.0 or 6.5 on your home computer, you receive a message telling you that the install cannot be completed because the Network Adapter is not found.

The first and one of the most important steps is to clearly identify your NIC’s brand and model. The key here is the unique PCI vendor and device ID. There are multiple ways to find this out, and most of them involve booting the machine with another OS (Windows or Linux). But here is the easiest way that starts directly at the stuck ESXi installation process:

When you see the nasty error message displayed at the top of this post then just hit [Alt] and [F1] on your keyboard at the computer’s console. You will be greeted with a login prompt: log in as root without a password (just hit [Return] at the password prompt). Now run the following command:

lspci -v | grep “Class 0200″ -B 1

If you do not use an English keyboard you may find it hard to type this command (esp. the special characters -, ” and |), because the English keyboard mapping is in effect regardless of what your layout is. You can change the effective layout by running a command like

localcli system settings keyboard layout set -l German

This will switch to the German layout. You can list all available layouts and their correct label to be used with the -l switch by running

localcli system settings keyboard layout list

Alternatively you can keep the English layout and enter all special characters using Alt+NumPad ASCII codes: is code 45, | is code 124 and is code 34.

If you finally managed to type the lspci command line correctly then the output will look similar to this:

0000:02:00.0 Ethernet controller Network controller: Realtek Realtek 8168 Gigabit Ethernet
Class 0200: 10ec:8168

Here you are: (In this example) you have a Realtek 8168 Gigabit NIC with the PCI ID id 10ec:8168.

here is a workaround for you … I have created a package that includes the original VMware net-r8168, net-r8169, net-sky2 and net-s2io drivers and uses the name (net51-drivers), and published it on my V-Front Online Depot.

If your host is already installed and has a direct Internet connection then you can install it from an ESXi shell by running the following commands:

esxcli software acceptance set –level=CommunitySupported

Slide01

esxcli network firewall ruleset set -e true -r httpClient

Slide02

esxcli software vib install -n net51-drivers -d http://vibsdepot.v-front.de

Slide03

As you can see I had to add the –no-sig-check to install the vib. It might be this is not needed in your situation, though.

reboot

How to delete stuck snapshot from FreeNAS

When you’re trying to delete a snapshot from the FreeNAS you receive a message cannot destroy snapshot backups@auto-20140315.1448-2d: dataset is busy. 

This may be caused by stuck replication job is preventing the snapshot from being deleted.

Run the following command to see what is being held.

 zfs holds Data@auto-20141107.1513-4w
NAME                        TAG           TIMESTAMP
Data@auto-20141107.1513-4w  freenas:repl  Fri Nov  7 15:16 2014

You can then release the stuck snapshot.

[root@NAS] ~# zfs release -r freenas:repl Data@auto-20141107.1513-4w

Then you are able to delete the snapshot.

[root@NAS] ~# zfs destroy -r Data@auto-20141107.1513-4w

Updated Chrome breaks vSphere web client (Console is disabled)

 Update provided below!

 

Client Plugin NPAPI

 

Google has been threatening to remove NPAPI (Netscape Plugin Application Programming Interface) support for some time now and they’ve tested the waters with version 42 by disabling it. Since theVMware Client Integration Plugin requires NPAPI, administrators now have to enter their credentials manually. Terrible, I know!

Missing Plugin

Apart from having to enter your credentials by hand, you’ll also lose the ability to transfer files from your desktop to a datastore via the browser or deploy OVF templates. You can still console VM’s via your browser and with the VMware Remote Console.

If you’ve updated Chrome, it’s too late as Google does not support rolling back. IE will continue to function however.

I have contacted VMware regarding this issue and will provide immediate updates.

 

UPDATE: Google has provided an override to enable NPAPI support. Simply enter the following in your browser:

chrome://flags/#enable-npapi

Then click Enable.

enableNPAPI

Cisco ASA 8.4 on GNS3

Configure GNS3 as following. ( I am using Ver 0.8.2 Beta 2, Also Tested 8.3 with Windows 7 64 bit which worked without any issues).  Type the code below into relevant fields

 

Qemu Options: -vnc none -vga none -m 1024 -icount auto -hdachs 980,16,32
Kernel cmd line: -append ide_generic.probe_mask=0x01 ide_core.chs=0.0:980,16,32 auto nousb console=ttyS0,9600 bigphysarea=65536
Configure the paths for Initrd and Kernel to where you have extracted the files.

 

Converting physical Windows XP system to virtual system using virtualbox

Windows XP is no longer supported by Microsoft as of April, 2014. Most people will be upgrading their computer to Windows 7 or Windows 8. However there are some mission critical system that needs to run Windows XP, for those computers, you can virtualize them using VirtualBox and maintain them separately as a VM. Here’s the steps I took to convert the physical system to virtual system.

1. Convert the physical system to virtual system. I used Disk2vhd utility by sysinternal. You run this utility on the physical Windows XP machine. Make sure to uncheck use Vhdx option.

disk2vhd

2. Download Virtualbox and install on the Windows 7/8 system. Before I create a new machine, I like to change the Default Machine Folder. By default the machine information are stored in the individual user folder. I change them to c:\VirtualBox so all users will see the virtual machine no matter who they are logged in as. Go to File –> Preferences –> General to change the Default Machine Folder option. You will also need to add an environment variable (System Variable) VBOX_USER_HOME with the value c:\VirtualBox, so all users can have access to the VM.

env_variable

3. Create a new VM. When it asks for the Hard Drive, you choose Use an existing virtual hard drive file option. Then you browse and look for the vhd file you created on step 1.

4. Start the machine. You now have virtual copy of the physical system.

Troubleshooting

1. When the Windows boots, your system shows blue screen of death and reboots.

If you start the Windows in a safe mode you are able to start the Windows. In my case, it was a aksfridge.sys file that was causing the blue screen. Start the Windows XP in safe mode (F8 before the Windows boots). Go to registry and delete any reference that has aksfridge. There are trees that cannot be deleted, you need to only delete any references that you are able to delete and do not worry about the trees that you cannot delete.

2. When the system boots, it asks for activation

If none of your existing product keys work, you will need to re-install the Windows. Insert the Windows XP CD and run the installation procedure. When you see the Welcome to Setup screen, press ENTER to choose the Wincdows XP now option. On the next screen, after the system has found the Windows installation on the c:\windows folder, you must choose the Repair option by pressing R key.

winxp1

winxp2

 

After you do the repair installaion, you can activate the Windows using your own product key. You will need to run all the service pack and updates after the repair installation is done. The repair installation will reinstall windows, but leave the settings and installed programs alone.

 

Share Folders between Host and Guest OS in VirtualBox

First, you have to install VirtualBox Guest Additions in the guest OS. You can do this by going to Devices and clicking on Install Guest Editions.

share folders between guest and host

Once installed and your guest OS rebooted, you need to create a virtual shared folder. You can do this by going to Devices again and clicking on Shared Folders.

shared folders

Now click on the Add New Shared Folder button on the right.

share files virtualbox

In the Folder Path box, click the down arrow and then click Other. Browse to the folder on the host OS that you would like to share with the guest OS. In the Folder Name box, give your share a name. You can choose to make it read-only and to make the shared folder permanent.

add a shared folder

Click OK and the new shared folder will show up under Machine Folders if you chose to make it Permanent, otherwise it will show under Transient Folders.

share folders virtualbox

Now click OK to close the Shared Folders dialog. You have to do one more thing in order to be able to actually access the folder on the host OS. Depending on whether the Guest OS is running Windows or Linux (Ubuntu, etc), the method is different.

Windows Guest

In this case, you can either browse to the shared folder by going to My Network Places – Entire Network – VirtualBox Shared Folders or you can map a drive letter to that shared folder. I prefer the second method to make it easily accessible.

net use x: \\vboxsvr\sharename

To do this, open an command prompt and type in the above command. Simply replace sharename with the Folder Name you used when adding a share. Note that you do NOT need to change vboxsvr.

Linux Guest

To mount a shared folder in a Linux Guest OS such as Ubuntu, type in the following command:

mount -t vboxsf [-o OPTIONS] sharename mountpoint

Replace sharename with the name of the share and mountpoint with the path where you want the share to be mounted (i.e. /mnt/share).

That’s it! You should get a message like “The command completed successfully” like shown below:

virtualbox shared folders

Now when you go to Explorer or My Computer, you’ll see the new drive mounted and ready for access!

mapped network drive

Not too hard eh? Of course, if you didn’t know you had to do all this, it could get quite frustrating! Now when you need to share files or folders in VirtualBox, you’ll be able to do it easily. Enjoy!